Dry Pack Canning in my home: Golden Flax Seeds

 

In this video I share details about a new study on Flaxseeds conducted recently touting the benefits of Dietary Flax for Radiation Poisoning.  Recently I purchased a fifty pound bag of Golden Flax Seeds from Vitamin Cottage and canned it using a Home Canning System from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.  I borrowed this canner from the Churchs Home Storage Center in Aurora Colorado this past week and used it to Dry Pack a variety of Foods recently purchased to bolster our years supply of Grains, Beans, and Seeds.

Here is the information from the Study on Flax.

Penn study shows an ancient crop effective in protecting against a 21st century hazard 

PHILADELPHIA – Flax has been part of human history for well over 30,000 years, used for weaving cloth, feeding people and animals, and even making paint. Now, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have discovered that it might have a new use for the 21st century: protecting healthy tissues and organs from the harmful effects of radiation. In a study just published in BMC Cancer, researchers found that a diet of flaxseed given to mice not only protects lung tissues before exposure to radiation, but can also significantly reduce damage after exposure occurs.

There are only a handful of potential mitigators of radiation effect, and none of them is nearly ready for the clinic,” says the principal investigator Melpo Christofidou-Solomidou, PhD, research associate professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Division. “Our current study demonstrates that dietary flaxseed, already known for its strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, works as both a mitigator and protector against radiation pneumonopathy.”

In several separate experiments, the researchers fed one group of mice a diet supplemented with 10 percent flaxseed, either three weeks before a dose of X-ray radiation to the thorax or two, four, or six weeks after radiation exposure. A control group subjected to the same radiation dose was given the same diet but receiving an isocaloric control diet without the flaxseed supplement. After four months, only 40 percent of the irradiated control group survived, compared to 70 to 88 percent of the irradiated flaxseed-fed animals. Various studies of blood, fluids, and tissues were conducted.

Dr. Christofidou-Solomidou and her colleagues found that the flaxseed diet conferred substantial benefits regardless of whether it was initiated before or after irradiation. Mice on flaxseed displayed improved survival rates and mitigation of radiation pneumonitis, with increased blood oxygenation levels, higher body weight, lower pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, and greatly reduced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis…”

Along with other researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine, the authors are conducting further pilot studies on the potential of flaxseed for mitigation of lung damage in patients awaiting lung transplants and those undergoing radiation therapy for the treatment of intra-thoracic malignancies. Dr. Christofidou-Solomidou is even conducting a pilot study for NASA on the benefits of flaxseed for astronauts on extended deep space missions. Lengthy space exploration missions require that the astronauts perform extravehicular activities (EVAs) for repairs, during which they can face exposure to high levels of solar and galactic radiation with the added risk factor of breathing 100 percent oxygen. “Hyperoxia superimposed with radiation could potentially cause some lung damage and some reason to worry for the astronauts,” she says. “We are one of a handful of teams in the US that can study radiation in addition to hyperoxia. So now we’re adding another level of complexity to the one-hit, radiation damage studies; the double-hit model is something novel, nobody has done it before.”

The researchers are already convinced enough to incorporate flaxseed into their own routine. “I actually eat it every morning,” says Dr. Cengel, noting, “The potential health benefits are significant and there is no known toxicity—it just makes good sense to me.”

Here is a link to a cooking video  I made a couple of years ago sharing details about how I use Dietary Flax (Both Brown and Golden Flax Seeds) in my Baking.

Jenny Hatch

 

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